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Reckless & Joy is a play and movie about two very different sides taking on a modern version of "Romeo & Juliet" by William Shakespeare. It was written by Lyss. This is the first of the "Narrator" series. The sequel will be upcoming and is named "Reckless vs. Tristan".

PlotEdit

George "Reckless" Monte and Princess Joy van Caper are polar opposite when it comes to background. However, with the manipulation of Narrator, the two are able to get along and get their wishes granted until Reckless's old nemesis Tristan comes into the picture. There are seven acts in the original play.


ACT 1-

The play starts with Narrator (given an unknown gender depending on portrayer) talking as the conscience of Thelma van Caper, Joy's mother, in royal England. They talk about how the kingdom is always busy and how she, her husband Charles, and Joy should take a vacation in the real world. Charles agrees and they set off for tomorrow.

In the suburbs of New York, Summer and Harvey keep a lookout for their mischeivous son George Monte aka Reckless. Things go awry as Reckless performs one of his tricks and fails in the process, crashing his parents' party and his principal's garden. Summer and Harvey discuss with Reckless that they will be taking a vacation in Florida while he will be in Montauk with his host family and relatives, Mateo and Raquel. All with the help of Narrator.

ACT 2-

Reckless is first to get to Montauk and Mateo and Raquel already have a fight. Reckless exits into the forest and speaks with Narrator. As they walk near the lake, they see Joy staring into her reflection. As Joy watches her reflection, a glimpse of Reckless appears, an allusion to the Indian tale of Jodha Akbar. Joy turns and she and Reckless start to speak. They go to the hotel where the van Capers are staying and Charles insults Reckless. Reckless leaves, asking Joy to meet her by the stars where the cliff jump will take place. They meet and their feelings arise as Reckless tells the story of Orion. At the end of the act, Narrator falls asleep upon a tree branch, only to realize that Reckless's nemesis Tristan Dale is back for revenge.

ACT 3-

When Tristan hears of wishes that Narrator is granting for Reckless and Joy, he orders Victor to kidnap Narrator and they crash Reckless's birthday party, manipulating Joy's mind against Reckless and instigating the cliff jump event that nearly cost Reckless's life two years ago. Reckless and Joy have a fight and Joy leaves him. Tristan meets Reckless afterwards, proposing the cliff jump to prove his title as Reckless. Joy runs to the hotel and tells Thelma everything that had happened. Thelma rethinks everything, including what Narrator had told her before about Reckless and Joy's wishes: Reckless wants to be accepted for his flaws and Joy wants to have freedom from her role in the kingdom and wants a friend to lean on. Thelma tells Joy to rethink it too and Joy finds out that Tristan only did this to get revenge on Reckless and ruin the plot.

ACT 4-

Narrator is found tied up in Tristan's treehouse and Tristan and Victor come inside with the author of the play, Lyss. Lyss comes up with a plan and freezes the scene and and unties Narrator and runs off with Narrator, cutting down the treehouse and unfreezes the scene. Tristan and Victor are zapped back to normal and look around and find themselves falling with the treehouse. The Cliff Jump Event is about to start and Narrator finds out the plan of Tristan's revenge (after all Narrator and Lyss know everything). Thelma and Charles meet Tristan and both have a debate about George and Tristan.

ACT 5-

Narrator enters when Victor pulls the trigger, revealing a blow of powder that blinds Reckless. Narrator disappears into Voice Over and manipulates Tristan's bike, making him fall and adds pressure and speed to Reckless's bike since the length of the jump has been expanded from 50 feet to 75 feet. Reckless wins and Tristan ends up in the hospital. Joy hugs and congratulates Reckless and he asks her out.

ACT 6-

Joy fumbles for a new dress to wear and Thelma gives her advice on what to wear for Reckless. At Pier 69, Reckless and Joy meet Serena van Caper, Joy's older married sister who left the kingdom because she married someone of a rival, lower-classs kingdom. Reckless sees as his future and acts like a jerk towards Joy, who dumps him and Narrator appears, hitting Reckless with a baguette. Reckless explains how he doesn't wanna be with Joy and considers going back to Dina, Tristan's sister and Reckless's ex.

CastEdit

Lyss as Narrator


-Monte-

Bradley Steven Perry as Reckless

Beth Littleford as Summer Monte

Brad Pitt as Harvey Monte

George Clooney as Mateo Monte

Sofia Vergara as Raquel Zenah-Monte


-Van Caper-

G. Hannelius as Joy van Caper

Daniella Fishel as Thelma van Caper

Regan Burns as Charles van Caper


-Dale-

Peyton Meyer as Tristan Dale

Cameron Boyce as Victor Marzela (Tristan's cousin)

Henry Winkler as Clyde Dale


-Other-

Channing Tatum as Marcel Goodman

Kaili Thorne as Serena van Caper-Goodman

Calum Worthy as Frank/Waiter

William Daniels as Edgar Zingigar


AllusionsEdit

There were a good few allusions in this play. Some were marked by footnotes.

  • Summer states that Reckless will be turning fifteen in three days. This gives reference to Juliet whose fourteenth birthday is in two weeks.
  • When Reckless sees Joy at the lake in Montauk and catches the reflecton, the reference is forwarded to a love story of a Muslim king and Hindu princess when they first saw each other at the city of Agra.
  • Another reference to "Romeo and Juliet" is planted when Narrator calls Reckless "Romeo".
  • At the end, Narrator tries to get Reckless to go after Joy before she gets onto her flight at 5:15, a reference to sad ballad called "5:15" by Bridgit Mendler.

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